Browse Members (60)
Join this Group
Report this Group
Group Statistics
Leader: SMantz
Views: 2040 views
Members: 60 members
Photos: 0 photos
Topics: 1 discussion topics
Last Update: 1 years ago
Group Information
Group Name: New York
Description: Anyone here in New York City, or in the area? feel free to join, whether you are here or even if you’re just interested in NYC, or in local events. Thanks.

Feel free to contact the group coordinator, Steve Mantz, at: [email protected]. We have a group email list up and running which we’d be happy to add you to. thanks.
Category: Regions & Places
Members (60)
 [ view all 60 members ]

JConnor

PBassinson

NChaplin

RPollard

ARudnick
Discussion Topics (1)
 [ start topic ]  [ view all topics ]
New York groups discussion thread

1 post(s), updated 2 years ago
Comments (9)
 [ view all comments ]
SMantz – 11:19 AM on Nov. 6, 2008 reply | message
Hi. could some of you please send me an email? I would like to try to start discussing some potential ideas for the New York deliberative community. I really appreciate your involvement and help.

please email me at: [email protected].

Thanks.

Steve Mantz
SMantz – 11:16 AM on May. 28, 2008 reply | message
From: Ron Gross
Socratic Conversations

Dear Fellow Thinker,

You are warmly invited to join us to discuss:
DUMB & DUMBER?
ARE AMERICANS HOSTILE TO
KNOWLEDGE, INTELLIGENCE, AND REASON?

A Socratic Conversation conducted by Ronald Gross
on Thursday, June 5th, 4–5 p.m.
at the Gottesman Library, 525 W. 120th St.

* Do you see signs of "dumbing down" in our society?

* Does TV disseminate "junk thought" and celebrity culture? What hopes do you have for the mass media?

* Is our digital technology creating a culture of distraction — or making us more knowledgeable and intelligent?

* How well are schools instilling knowledge, skills, understanding, and competence?

* What roles should we play as educators — via cultural literacy, critical thinking, or other approaches?

Come share your experiences, thoughts, and feelings.

This highly-participatory conversation with fellow students is moderated by Ronald Gross, author of Socrates Way and Co-chair of the University Seminar on Innovation in Education.

This session is inspired by The Age of American Unreason by Susan Jacoby, an excerpt from which is available at http://www.susanjacoby.com/ (Pantheon).

Why Socrates? Because he strove throughout his life to foster reason and intelligence, in both private and public affairs. Socrates is an iconic figure in Education – but he transcends the profession in Western intellectual history. He engaged in lively, important conversations, exemplifying the values of dialogue and discussion.

This session is part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries. To assure yourself a spot, complete with diet hemlock and cookies, please RSVP to [email protected].

Individuals with disabilities are invited to request reasonable accommodations including, but not limited to sign language interpretation, Braille or large print materials, and a campus map of accessible features. Address these requests to the Office of Access and Services for Individuals with Disabilities at (212) 678-3689, [email protected], or Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services at (212) 678-3853 V/TTY, [email protected].



From: Ron Gross
Socratic Conversations

Dear Fellow Thinker,

You are warmly invited to join us to discuss:
DUMB & DUMBER?
ARE AMERICANS HOSTILE TO
KNOWLEDGE, INTELLIGENCE, AND REASON?

A Socratic Conversation conducted by Ronald Gross
on Thursday, June 5th, 4–5 p.m.
at the Gottesman Library, 525 W. 120th St.

* Do you see signs of "dumbing down" in our society?

* Does TV disseminate "junk thought" and celebrity culture? What hopes do you have for the mass media?

* Is our digital technology creating a culture of distraction — or making us more knowledgeable and intelligent?

* How well are schools instilling knowledge, skills, understanding, and competence?

* What roles should we play as educators — via cultural literacy, critical thinking, or other approaches?

Come share your experiences, thoughts, and feelings.

This highly-participatory conversation with fellow students is moderated by Ronald Gross, author of Socrates Way and Co-chair of the University Seminar on Innovation in Education.

This session is inspired by The Age of American Unreason by Susan Jacoby, an excerpt from which is available at http://www.susanjacoby.com/ (Pantheon).

Why Socrates? Because he strove throughout his life to foster reason and intelligence, in both private and public affairs. Socrates is an iconic figure in Education – but he transcends the profession in Western intellectual history. He engaged in lively, important conversations, exemplifying the values of dialogue and discussion.

This session is part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries. To assure yourself a spot, complete with diet hemlock and cookies, please RSVP to [email protected].

Individuals with disabilities are invited to request reasonable accommodations including, but not limited to sign language interpretation, Braille or large print materials, and a campus map of accessible features. Address these requests to the Office of Access and Services for Individuals with Disabilities at (212) 678-3689, [email protected], or Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services at (212) 678-3853 V/TTY, [email protected].

Ronald Gross
Co-Chair, University Seminar on Innovation
in Education
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

CELL: 774-279-3696
PHONE: 516-487-0235
FAX: 516-829-8462
E-MAIL: [email protected]

Mailing address:
17 Myrtle Drive
Great Neck, New York 11021

WEB-SITES:
COLUMBIA: www.columbiaseminar.org
INDEPENDENT SCHOLARSHIP: www.independentscholars.net
PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING: www.ronaldgross.com
SOCRATES: www.socratesway.com

BLOGS:
LIFELONG LEARNING: www.adulted.about.com
CONVERSATION/DIALOGUE: www.conversationcafe.org

Ronald Gross
Co-Chair, University Seminar on Innovation
in Education
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

CELL: 774-279-3696
PHONE: 516-487-0235
FAX: 516-829-8462
E-MAIL: [email protected]

Mailing address:
17 Myrtle Drive
Great Neck, New York 11021

WEB-SITES:
COLUMBIA: www.columbiaseminar.org
INDEPENDENT SCHOLARSHIP: www.independentscholars.net
PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING: www.ronaldgross.com
SOCRATES: www.socratesway.com

BLOGS:
LIFELONG LEARNING: www.adulted.about.com
CONVERSATION/DIALOGUE: www.conversationcafe.org
SMantz – 12:57 PM on May. 2, 2008 reply | message
From: "Bernard Roy" <[email protected]>
Subject: Upcoming Cafe Philo
Greetings,

Our next cafe philo is scheduled for Thursday, May 8th. As usual we shall convene at Bamiyan Restaurant, located on the north west corner of Third Avenue and 26th Street in Manhattan, NY. We usually start at 6:30. Our topic of discussion will be:

Is atheism an untenable position?

Jason Greendyk, a graduating senior of Ramapo College, who is presently doing an in dependant study on doing philosophy in public, will be the guest moderator. I will attend as a participant.

I attach the poster.

I hope to see you all,
Best,

Bernard
SMantz – 10:10 AM on May. 1, 2008 reply | message
From: Ron Gross

Dear Fellow Citizen:

Please join us and share your views on:

ARE YOU BEING HEARD?
Maximizing Your Impact as a Citizen Today

A Socratic Conversation conducted by Ronald Gross on
Thursday, May 8th , 4 – 5 p.m.
at the Gottesman Library, 525 West 120th St.

* What political issues do you care most about?

* In working for the changes you seek, so you feel empowered? Disempowered? Or….?

* How could you be even more effective in influencing policy?

* How do you use technology to maximize your effectiveness as a citizen?

* How can you connect with others to share your concerns and effect change?

* Do you discern, or can you imagine, better ways to foster the changes you would like to see?

* Does the current ramp-up to the elections next Fall, seem to be focused on the issues you consider important? If not, what can be done about that?

Come share your experiences, thoughts, and feelings.

Teachers College has a distinguished history of teaching about citizenship via the Citizenship Education Project, the birth of Social Studies, working with NCSS, and, currently, the curriculum based on Spike Lee’s "When the Levees Broke."

This Conversation is offered as part of the Satya Graha Forum, a series of events concomitant with the presentation by the Metropolitan Opera of Philip Glass’ opera about Mahatma Gandhi and his philosophy of social change through non-violence.

NEXT SESSION: Thursday, JUNE 5, 4 p.m.: DUMB AND DUMBER?! Are Americans Hostile to Intelligence, Reason, and Knowledge?



SMantz – 11:34 AM on Apr. 24, 2008 reply | message
Below is a notice of a deliberative event for 4/24. this is from Ron Gross, who runs an ongoing deliberative group here.

Just a reminder of our prelude to this weekend’s 40th anniversary commemoration of the 1968 student protests. The full announcement, which you have received previously, is pasted below the signature for your convenience.

Warmly,

RON GROSS

Please join us to discuss:

1968 and TODAY: What Should Activists Be Thinking and Doing Now?

A Socratic Conversation on Thursday, 4/24, 4 – 5p.m.
(concomitant with 40th anniversary events on campus April 24 – 27, to commemorate 1968, and to promote intergenerational dialogue).

** How do today’s issues relate to those of 1968? What are the differences and similarities?

** What kinds of activism are appropriate for students and faculty today?

** What questions should we ask about "the legacy of 1968"?

** How might the activities over this weekend be serviceable for you?

Come share your thoughts, experiences, and reflections.

This highly-participatory conversation is moderated by Ronald Gross, author of Socrates Way and Co-chair of the University Seminar on Innovation in Education.

Why Socrates? Because he opposed injustice in his society, choosing to take the hemlock rather than compromise his principles. Socrates is an iconic figure in Education – but he transcends the profession in Western intellectual history. He engaged in lively, important conversations, exemplifying the values of dialogue and discussion.

This session is part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries. To assure yourself a spot, complete with diet hemlock and cookies, please RSVP to [email protected].

NEXT SESSION: Thursday, May 8, 4pm: ARE YOU BEING HEARD?: MAXIMIZING YOUR ROLE AS A CITIZEN TODAY.

Where: Second Floor Salon

The Gottesman Libraries @ Teachers College | 525 W. 120th St. | New York, NY 10027 |

SMantz – 10:13 AM on Apr. 7, 2008 reply | message
below is a notice of a deliberative event for 4/10, from Ron Gross, who runs an ongoing deliberative group here.

Please join us to discuss: CONSUMED?!
Do Americans NEED Everything That They WANT?

Thursday, April 10, 4 – 5 p.m.
A Socratic Conversation Conducted by Ronald Gross
Gottesman Library, 525 West 120th St., 2nd floor

* Is Consumerism a blessing, a scourge, or….? Is it a welcome celebration of our economy’s
achievements in enhancing our "standard of living" through products and services? OR…is it an obsession
with material possessions and luxurious self-indulgence? OR…….?

* What is the impact of our "market economy" on us, on our children, on our culture, and on education?

* Do Americans buy too much stuff? Is “shop ‘til you drop” more than a joke about the lifestyles of many
Americans? Why are so many Americans over their heads in credit-card debt?

* How are advertising and media effecting young people?

* What is the relationship between consumerism and citizenship?

* Are many Americans on a “Work and Spend” treadmill? How do you feel about the movement to
“down-shift” by working less, earning less, and living more?

Come share your thoughts, experiences, and reflections.

This highly-participatory conversation is moderated by Ronald Gross, author of Socrates Way and Co-chair of the University Seminar on Innovation in Education.

Why Socrates? Because he said often, as he strolled through the Athenian agora (their version of the Mall): "How many things there are here, that I do not need." Socrates is an iconic figure in Education – but he transcends the profession in Western intellectual history. He engaged in lively, important conversations, exemplifying the values of dialogue and discussion.

This session is part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries.

NEXT SESSION: Thursday, April 24th, 4 p.m.: Activism: 1968 and Today (concomitant with 40th anniversary events on campus this week, to commemorate 1968, and to promote intergenerational dialogue).

SMantz – 9:08 AM on Mar. 21, 2008 reply | message
Hi everyone. this is just a brief note to everyone. please note there are several Conversation Week events planned for NYC next week. Also, NYC has its own link at the main website. below are the scheduled events. thanks.

Joy and Power of Great Talk
to be celebrated at New York events during global Conversation Week March 24-30, 2008

Under the aegis of Conversation Cafй, columnist Ron Gross is providing New Yorkers with opportunities to participate in Conversation Week, in venues ranging from the atrium of the IBM building on Madison Avenue, to the Gottesman Library at Columbia University.

To preview Conversation Week, Gross will give a presentation on March 13th at the Albert Ellis Institute, and Socrates will appear on March 20th, the first day of Spring, …in front of the Donnell Library at 20 W. 53rd Street (across the street from the Museum of Modern Art)

Among the free events already scheduled* are:

** " Stop Boring Yourself to Death: Getting from Small Talk to Exhilarating Conversation – Anywhere, Anytime, with Anyone. " Lecture by Ron Gross on Thursday, Mar. 13 (pre-CW Week presentation), 6:30 p.m., Albert Ellis Institute, 45 East 65th St. (Contact: Ron Gross).

** Socrates, the 5th century philosopher famed for engaging his fellow Athenians in vibrant street-corner conversations, will reappear at noon on Thursday, March 20th, the first day of Spring, infront of the Donnell Library at 20 W. 53rd Street (across the street from the Museum of Modern Art), to discuss the joy and power of conversation, and provide information about Conversation Week. (Socrates is portrayed by Ron Gross, author of Socrates’ Way ( www.SocratesWay.com ). (Contact Ron at [email protected] ).

** Socrates Cafй , Tues., Mar. 25, 6:45 p.m., Atrium at 590 Madison Ave., between 56th and 57th streets (former IBM Building). Special CW meeting of this regular weekly gathering. (Contact: Evan Sinclair).

_** Socratic Conversation , Wed., Mar. 26, 4 p.m., Gottesman Libraries Columbia University (Teachers College), 525 W. 120th St. Special CW session of this twice-monthly dialogue group. (Contact: Ronald Gross).

** Cafe Philo , Thurs., Mar. 27, 6:30 p.m., Bamiyan Restaurant, 358 3rd Ave. (26th St.). Special CW meeting of this twice-monthly conversation on the Parisian (Contact: Bernard Roy).

* Please confirm closer to date.

More events are being planned and will be announced shortly.

Want to be involved? — by attending a group, or starting your own? Find everything you need to know at: http://www.conversationweek.org/homepage/


SMantz – 3:41 PM on Jan. 14, 2008 reply | message
Hi everyone. If you wish, please feel free to contact me, regardinng any events, questions or comments, or anything at all, at [email protected]. thanks.

Steve
SMantz – 4:08 PM on Oct. 1, 2007 reply | message
I appreciate the participation of everyone who is a local resident of the area, or who simply feels some link to or interest in the City of New York. Thanks!